Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Comparison of the recovery time of remimazolam besylate and propofol for gastrointestinal endoscopy sedation in elderly patients.

Background: Recovery time is a crucial factor in ensuring the safety and effectiveness of both patients and endoscopy centers. Propofol is often preferred due to its fast onset and minimal side effects. Remimazolam is a new intravenous sedative agent, characterized by its rapid onset of action, quick recovery and organ-independent metabolism. Importantly, its effect can be specifically antagonized by flumazenil. The primary goal of this study is to compare the recovery time of remimazolam besylate and propofol anesthesia during endoscopic procedures in elderly patients. Methods: 60 patients aged 65-95 years who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy were randomly and equally assigned to two groups: the remimazolam group (Group R) and the propofol group (Group P). The primary measure was the recovery time, defined as the time from discontinuing remimazolam or propofol until reaching an Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation scale (OAA/S) score of 5 (responds readily to name spoken in normal tone). The time required to achieve an OAA/S score of 3 (responds after name spoken loudly or repeatedly along with glazed marked ptosis) was also recorded and compared. Results: The recovery time for Group R (2.6 ± 1.6 min) was significantly shorter than that for Group P (10.8 ± 3.0 min), with a 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.949-9.431 min, p <0.001. Similarly, the time to attain an OAA/S score of 3 was significantly less in Group R (1.6 ± 0.9 min) compared to Group P (9.6 ± 2.6 min), with a 95% CI: 6.930-8.957 min, p <0.001. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that remimazolam anesthesia combined with flumazenil antagonism causes a shorter recovery time for elderly patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy compared to propofol. Remimazolam followed by flumazenil antagonism provides a promising alternative to propofol for geriatric patients, particularly during gastrointestinal endoscopy.

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