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Association of oxidative balance score with helicobacter pylori infection and mortality in the US population.

Background: Limited research has examined the association between Oxidative Balance Score (OBS) and mortality, particularly in individuals with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This study investigates the correlation between OBS and H. pylori infection and their impacts on all-cause mortality within a cohort of individuals, considering both infected and uninfected individuals. Methods: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2018, comprising 4,532 participants, were analyzed. Logistic regression analyses assessed the relationship between H. pylori infection and relevant covariates. Cox regression and restricted cubic spline analysis evaluated the association between total OBS, lifestyle OBS, dietary OBS, and all-cause mortality in H. pylori -positive and -negative individuals. Results: Restricted cubic spline modeling revealed a linear relationship between total OBS and all-cause mortality, particularly in H. pylori -negative patients. Total OBS, dietary OBS, and lifestyle OBS inversely correlated with H. pylori infection, even after adjusting for confounders. Higher dietary OBS was associated with decreased mortality risk exclusively in H. pylori -positive individuals, while lifestyle OBS was associated with mortality only in H. pylori -negative individuals. These findings underscore the complex relationships between OBS, H. pylori infection, and mortality, stressing the importance of infection status in assessing oxidative balance's impact on health. Conclusion: In this sample, higher OBS was associated with lower H. pylori infection risks. Dietary OBS correlated significantly with all-cause mortality in H. pylori -positive individuals, while lifestyle OBS was notably associated with mortality in H. pylori -negative participants. Further research is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and clinical implications of these findings.

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