Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effect of bilateral low serratus anterior plane block on quality of recovery after trans-subxiphoid robotic thymectomy: Results of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the impact of ultrasound-guided, bilateral, low level (T8-T9) deep serratus anterior plane (DSAP) blocks on postoperative recovery quality and postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing trans-subxiphoid robotic thymectomy (TRT). Methods: 39 patients undergoing TRT were randomized to receive either low DSAP block under general anesthesia (Group S) or the sham block (Group C) on each side. The primary outcome was the QoR-40 score at postoperative day (POD) 1. Secondary outcomes included numeric rating scale (NRS) scores over time, postoperative 48 hours opioid consumption, QoR-40 scores at POD 2, 30, and 90. Results: The QoR-40 scores on POD1-2 were higher in Group S than in Group C [179.1 (4.9) vs 167.7 (2.8), P < 0.01; 187.7 (4.6) vs 178.1 (3), P < 0.01, respectively]. Pain scores were significantly lower in Group S, both during resting and motion at postoperative 6h, 12h, and 24h (P < 0.05 for each). The total amount of sufentanil consumed in the first 48 h was lower in Group S than in Group C [61.4 (4.9) vs 78.9 (4.6), P < 0.001]. Conclusion: The bilateral low DSAP blocks enhanced the QoR-40 for 2 days postoperatively, relieved postsurgical pain, and reduced opioid consumption during the early postoperative period in patients undergoing TRT.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app