Journal Article
Observational Study
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High fibre and fluid intake increase the success of hypospadias surgery.

INTRODUCTION: Hypospadias is a congenital malformation of the urethral meatus in the ventral penis that requires surgery. Fibre and fluid intake can accelerate the healing process, act as an anti-inflammatory and support the success of surgery. Based on hypospadias objective scoring evaluation (HOSE) scoring, this study aims to determine whether a high-fibre diet and adequate fluid intake affect the outcome of hypospadias surgery.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: This analytic observational study used a case-control study design on 104 post-operative hypospadias patients at Ulin and Siaga Hospital Banjarmasin from 2018 to 2023 with quota sampling. Data were collected using personal data forms with hypospadias objective scoring evaluation (HOSE) and semi-quantitativefood frequency questionnaire (SQ-FFQ), which were analysed using a multinomial logistic regression test.

RESULTS: Patients with less-fibre-intake had a 99.10% lower chance of having an excellent surgical outcome than patients with moderate-fibre-intake (Adjusted Odds Ratio, Adj. OR: 0.009, 95% Confidence Intervals; 95%CI: 0.000, 0.249), and it was statistically significant. The study did not find any association between fluid intake and surgical outcome, this could be due to the fact that most of the patient had good fluid intake.

CONCLUSION: The study found that high fibre intake increases the success of hypospadia surgery.

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