Journal Article
Observational Study
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Correlation of risk factors with systemic inflammatory response syndrome in burn patients at the Burn Center of Dr Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia.

INTRODUCTION: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is the main cause of death in burns and is associated with high burn mortality rates. SIRS occurs when burns are in the subacute phase and is affected by several factors, such as host, trauma and management. The research was conducted at the Burn Center of Dr Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia, using retrospective observational analytic research design. The aim of the study was to assess the correlation of risk factors which include age, extent of burns, cause of burns, inhalation trauma, history of hyperglycaemia, anaemia, hypoalbuminemia and ESBL infection with the incidence of SIRS.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study is observational analytic research using a retrospective design and secondary data of all burn patients treated at the Burn Center of Dr Soetomo General Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia from January 2018 to December 2019.

RESULTS: A total of 163 burn patients were included. Among comorbidities found were inhalation trauma (39.3%), diabetes mellitus (2.5%), anaemia (14.7%), hypoalbuminemia (40.5%) and ESBL infection (1.2%). A total of 11 patients (6.7%) suffered from SIRS. The statistical analysis showed that anaemia (p=0.012), hypoalbuminemia (p=0.030) and the percentage of burns (p=0.001) were significantly correlated to the incidence of SIRS while age, sex, cause of burn injury, inhalation trauma, diabetes mellitus and ESBL infection have no significant correlation with SIRS.

CONCLUSION: Burn surface area is the most influencing factor of SIRS incident. It is important to meticulously monitor patients with extensive burn areas for indications of SIRS. However, the sample size of this study was relatively small, and it used a retrospective approach, so a larger sample size and a prospective or cohort design method were recommended for further study.

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