Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Therapeutic strategies against metabolic imbalance in a male mouse model with 5-HT2CR loss-of-function.

Endocrinology 2024 May 31
The serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR)-melanocortin pathway plays well-established roles in the regulation of feeding behavior and body weight homeostasis. Dysfunctions in this system, such as loss-of-function mutations in the Htr2c gene, can lead to hyperphagia and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential therapeutic strategies for ameliorating hyperphagia, hyperglycemia and obesity associated with a loss-of-function mutation in the Htr2c gene (Htr2cF327L/Y). We demonstrated that re-expressing functional 5-HT2CR solely in hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons is sufficient to reduce food intake and body weight in Htr2cF327L/Y mice subjected to a high-fat diet. In addition, 5-HT2CR expression restores the responsiveness of POMC neurons to lorcaserin, a selective agonist for 5-HT2CR. Similarly, administration of melanotan II (MT II), an agonist of the melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R), effectively suppresses feeding and weight gain in Htr2cF327L/Y mice. Strikingly, promoting wheel running activity in Htr2cF327L/Y mice results in a decrease in HFD consumption and improved glucose homeostasis. Together, our findings underscore the crucial role of the melanocortin system in alleviating hyperphagia and obesity related to dysfunctions of the 5-HT2CR, and further suggest that MC4R agonists and lifestyle interventions might hold promise in counteracting hyperphagia, hyperglycemia and obesity in individuals carrying rare variants in Htr2c gene.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app