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Associations of four surrogate insulin resistance indexes with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in Chinese patients with obesity: a cross-sectional study.

Endocrine 2024 May 31
OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to evaluate the association of four surrogate indexes of IR with NASH in patients with obesity.

METHODS: A total of 270 patients who underwent bariatric surgery, were included in this cross-sectional study. NASH was diagnosed based on liver biopsies. Binary logistics regression analyses were performed to assess the associations of four surrogate indexes of IR (HOMA-IR, Matsuda index, TyG, and TG/HDL-C) with NASH in patients with obesity. The restricted cubic spline was used to assess the dose-response associations of surrogate indexes of IR with NASH after adjusting for confounding factors.

RESULTS: NASH was diagnosed in 136 patients, with a prevalence of 50.37%. Compared with tertile 1, the fully adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of NASH for tertile 3 were 2.711(1.113-6.608) and 0.297 (0.152-0.579) for TyG and Matsuda index. Consistently, per SD increment of TyG were still significantly associated with 64% increased risks of NASH, and per SD increment of Matsuda index were still significantly associated with 38% decreased risks of NASH. In contrast, no significant associations were found between HOMA-IR and TG/HDL-C and the risk of NASH in patients with obesity (all P > 0.05). After adjusting covariates in restricted cubic splines, the risk of NASH decreased with the increment of Matsuda Index levels (P-nonlinear = 0.442, P-overall = 0.007) and with the decrement of TyG levels (P-nonlinear = 0.004, P-overall = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: In patients with obesity, TyG and Matsuda index were independently related to the risk of NASH after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In addition, compared with HOMA-IR and TG/HDL-C, the Matsuda index and TyG may be more suitable for NASH prediction in patients with obesity.

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