Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Sepsis as a Potential Risk Factor for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Purpose: Sepsis is a common and critical condition in intensive care units (ICUs) known to complicate patient outcomes. Previous studies have indicated an association between sepsis and various ICU morbidities, including upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). However, the extent of this relationship and its implications in ICU settings remain inadequately quantified. This study aims to elucidate the association between sepsis and the risk of UGIB in ICU patients. Methods: A comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted, encompassing nine studies with a total of nearly 9000 participants. These studies reported events for both sepsis and nonsepsis patients separately. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to assess the risk of UGIB in septic versus nonseptic ICU patients. Subgroup analyses were conducted based on age and study design, and both unadjusted and adjusted ORs were examined. Results: The pooled OR indicated a significant association between sepsis and UGIB (OR = 3.276, 95% CI: 1.931 to 5.557). Moderate heterogeneity was observed (I² = 43.9%). The association was significant in adults (pooled OR = 4.083) but not in children. No difference in association was found based on the study design. Unadjusted and adjusted ORs differed slightly, indicating the influence of confounding factors. Conclusion: This meta-analysis reveals a significant association between sepsis and an increased risk of UGIB in ICU patients, particularly in adults. These findings highlight the need for vigilant monitoring and proactive management of septic ICU patients to mitigate the risk of UGIB. Future research should focus on understanding the underlying mechanisms and developing tailored preventive strategies.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app