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DXA-derived lumbar bone strain index corrected for kyphosis is associated with vertebral fractures and trabecular bone score in acromegaly.

Endocrine 2024 May 30
PURPOSE: The bone strain index (BSI) is a marker of bone deformation based on a finite element analysis inferred from dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, that has been proposed as a predictor of fractures in osteoporosis (i.e., higher BSI indicates a lower bone's resistance to loads with consequent higher risk of fractures). We aimed to investigate the association between lumbar BSI and vertebral fractures (VFs) in acromegaly.

METHODS: Twenty-three patients with acromegaly (13 males, mean age 58 years; three with active disease) were evaluated for morphometric VFs, trabecular bone score (TBS), bone mineral density (BMD) and BSI at lumbar spine, the latter being corrected for the kyphosis as measured by low-dose X-ray imaging system (EOS®-2D/3D).

RESULTS: Lumbar BSI was significantly higher in patients with VFs as compared to those without fractures (2.90 ± 1.46 vs. 1.78 ± 0.33, p = 0.041). BSI was inversely associated with TBS (rho -0.44; p = 0.034), without significant associations with BMD (p = 0.151), age (p = 0.500), BMI (p = 0.957), serum IGF-I (p = 0.889), duration of active disease (p = 0.434) and sex (p = 0.563).

CONCLUSIONS: Lumbar BSI corrected for kyphosis could be proposed as integrated parameter of spine arthropathy and osteopathy in acromegaly helping the clinicians in identifying patients with skeletal fragility possibly predisposed to VFs.

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