Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The essential role of adenine nucleotide translocase 4 on male reproductive function in mice.

Adenine nucleotide translocator 4 (Ant4), an ATP/ADP transporter expressed in the early phases of spermatogenesis, plays a crucial role in male fertility. While Ant4 loss causes early arrest of meiosis and increased apoptosis of spermatogenic cells in male mice, its other potential functions in male fertility remain unexplored. Here, we utilized Ant4 knockout mice to delineate the effects of Ant4-deficiency on male reproduction. Our observations demonstrated that Ant4-deficiency led to infertility and impaired testicular development, which was further investigated by evaluating testicular oxidative stress, autophagy, and inflammation. Specifically, the loss of Ant4 led to an imbalance of oxidation and antioxidants. Significant ultrastructural alterations were identified in the testicular tissues of Ant4-deficient mice, including swelling of mitochondria, loss of cristae, and accumulation of autophagosomes. Our results also showed that autophagic flux and AKT-AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway were affected in Ant4-deficient mice. Moreover, Ant4 loss increased the expression of pro-inflammatory factors. Overall, our findings underscored the importance of Ant4 in regulating oxidative stress, autophagy, and inflammation in testicular tissues. Taken together, these insights provided a nuanced understanding of the significance of Ant4 in testicular development.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app