Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Tolerability of glutamine supplementation in older adults: a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

In this double-blind placebo-controlled randomized investigation, we assessed the tolerability of glutamine in older adults recruited from three daycare centers. The relevance of studying glutamine supplementation in elderly patients lies in its potential to provide a well-tolerated intervention. Glutamine, a crucial amino acid, plays a vital role in various physiological processes, including immune function and protein synthesis. Understanding its impact on older adults is essential, given the potential implications for their health and well-being. Participants received a daily dose of 12.4 g of oral effervescent glutamine (EGln group) or maltodextrin (placebo group) for 60 days. Fifteen patients from each group completed the study. The mean ages were 77.0±9.1 and 79.0±6.9 years for the EGln and placebo groups, respectively. We evaluated body mass index, aminogram, hemogram, plasma levels of glucose, prealbumin, albumin, urea, creatinine, uric acid, C-reactive protein, vitamin D, calcium, sodium, potassium, and the plasma activities of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. Notably, we quantified a broad array of inflammatory markers and growth factors providing a holistic understanding of the potential effects of glutamine supplementation. The results demonstrated that oral glutamine did not induce significant changes in any evaluated parameters, and no adverse effects were reported. This finding suggested that the dosage of glutamine used in this study was well-tolerated and safe. This information contributes to the broader understanding of glutamine supplementation, emphasizing its safety and supporting its potential as a viable intervention for maintaining health in aging individuals.

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