Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The Appraisal of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: Lesson from Comparison of Surgical Outcomes.

The population of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) is constantly growing. There seems to be a consensus that these patients are difficult to manage especially if compared to patients with acquired heart disease. The aim of this study is to compare outcomes and results of cardiac surgery in ACHD patients with a reference population of adults with acquired cardiac disease. Retrospective study of 5053 consecutive patients older than 18 years hospitalized for cardiac surgery during a 5-years period in our Institution. Two groups of patients were identified. Group I: 419 patients operated for congenital heart disease; Group II: 4634 patients operated for acquired heart disease. In each Group were identified low, medium, and high-risk patients, according to validated scores. Right ventricular outflow tract surgery was the most frequent procedure in Group I, while coronary artery by-pass grafting was the most common in Group II. Patients with ACHD were younger (37.8 vs. 67.7 years), with higher number of previous operations (32.1% vs. 6.9%), had longer post-ICU hospital stay (11 vs. 8 days) but had lower ICU stay (1 vs. 2 days), shorter assisted mechanical ventilation (12 vs. 14 h) and lower surgical mortality (1 vs. 3.7%) (all p < 0.001). No differences were found in term of post-operative complications (12.4 vs. 15%). The surgical treatment of ACHD patients can be done with excellent results and if compared with acquired cardiac disease patients they have better results with shorter ICU stay and lower mortality.

Full text links

We have located open access text paper links.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app