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Clinicopathological significance of protein disulphide isomerase A3 and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in cervical carcinoma.

INTRODUCTION: Death in cervical cancer patients is usually due to invasion and metastasis due to the aggressive nature of the tumour. Therefore, it is critical to identify potent therapeutic targets and prognostic markers to detect high-risk patients.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: We assessed the immunohistochemical expression of protein disulphide isomerase A3 (PDIA3) and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) in 50 cases of cervical carcinoma, and we investigated their association with clinicopathological characteristics.

RESULTS: High PDIA3 was detected in 50% of cases, and statistical analysis revealed a positive correlation between high PDAI3 expression and tumour grade ( p < 0.001) and large tumour size ( p = 0.010), depth of stromal invasion ( p = 0.017), lymph-vascular invasion ( p = 0.005), parametrial invasion ( p < 0.001), nodal metastasis ( p < 0.001), and higher International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stages ( p < 0.001). Positive nuclear expression of p-STAT3 was detected in 44% of cases and showed significant association with histological grade (p = 0.036), tumour stage ( p = 0.021), nodal metastasis ( p = 0.020), and parametrial invasion ( p = 0.045); statistical analysis of the patient's survival data revealed that shorter overall survival and disease-free survival, S, were associated with high PDIA3 expression and positive p-STAT3 immunoexpression.

CONCLUSIONS: The high expression of PDIA3 and p-STAT3 was related to highly aggressive cervical carcinoma with poor prognosis, and high risk of recurrence after the standardised protocol of treatment. Hence, both PDIA3 and p-STAT3 could be considered as novel biomarkers for tumour progression and promising targets in the management of cervical carcinoma patients.

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