Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Role of diosmin in preventing doxorubicin-induced cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation, and hypertrophy: A mechanistic approach.

Chemotherapeutic drugs, such as doxorubicin (Dox), are commonly used to treat a variety of malignancies. However, Dox-induced cardiotoxicity limits the drug's clinical applications. Hence, this study intended to investigate whether diosmin could prevent or limit Dox-induced cardiotoxicity in an animal setting. Thirty-two rats were separated into four distinct groups of controls, those treated with Dox (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.), those treated with diosmin 100 mg plus Dox, and those treated with diosmin 200 mg plus Dox. At the end of the experiment, rats were anesthetized and sacrificed and their blood and hearts were collected. Cardiac toxicity markers were analyzed in the blood, and the heart tissue was analyzed by the biochemical assays MDA, GSH, and CAT, western blot analysis (NF-kB, IL-6, TLR-4, TNF-α, iNOS, and COX-2), and gene expression analysis (β-MHC, BNP). Formalin-fixed tissue was used for histopathological studies. We demonstrated that a Dox insult resulted in increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and hypertrophy as shown by increased MDA levels and reduced GSH content and CAT activity. Furthermore, Dox treatment induced cardiac hypertrophy and damage, as evidenced by the biochemical analysis, ELISA, western blot analysis, and gene expression analysis. However, co-administration of diosmin at both doses, 100 mg and 200 mg, mitigated these alterations. Data derived from the current research revealed that the cardioprotective effect of diosmin was likely due to its ability to mitigate oxidative stress and inflammation. However, further study is required to investigate the protective effects of diosmin against Dox-induced cardiotoxicity.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app