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Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes for Light Regulation of Elsinochrome Biosynthesis in Elsinoë arachidis .

Microorganisms 2024 May 20
Light regulation is critical in fungal growth, development, morphogenesis, secondary metabolism, and the biological clock. The fungus Elsinoë arachidis is known to produce the mycotoxin Elsinochrome (ESC), a key factor contributing to its pathogenicity, under light conditions. Although previous studies have predominantly focused on the light-induced production of ESC and its biosynthetic pathways, the detailed mechanisms underlying this process remain largely unexplored. This study explores the influence of light on ESC production and gene expression in E. arachidis . Under white light exposure for 28 days, the ESC yield was observed to reach 33.22 nmol/plug. Through transcriptome analysis, 5925 genes were identified as differentially expressed between dark and white light conditions, highlighting the significant impact of light on gene expression. Bioinformatics identified specific light-regulated genes, including eight photoreceptor genes, five global regulatory factors, and a cluster of 12 genes directly involved in the ESC biosynthesis, with expression trends confirmed by RT-qPCR. In conclusion, the study reveals the substantial alteration in gene expression associated with ESC biosynthesis under white light and identifies potential candidates for in-depth functional analysis. These findings advance understanding of ESC biosynthesis regulation and suggest new strategies for fungal pathogenicity control.

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