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Facial Skin Microbiome Composition and Functional Shift with Aging.

Microorganisms 2024 May 19
The change in the skin microbiome as individuals age is only partially known. To provide a better understanding of the impact of aging, whole-genome sequencing analysis was performed on facial skin swabs of 100 healthy female Caucasian volunteers grouped by age and wrinkle grade. Volunteers' metadata were collected through questionnaires and non-invasive biophysical measurements. A simple model and a biological statistical model were used to show the difference in skin microbiota composition between the two age groups. Taxonomic and non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the skin microbiome was more diverse in the older group (≥55 yo). There was also a significant decrease in Actinobacteria, namely in Cutibacterium acnes , and an increase in Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii . Some Streptococcus and Staphylococcus species belonging to the Firmicutes phylum and species belonging to the Proteobacteria phylum increased. In the 18-35 yo younger group, the microbiome was characterized by a significantly higher proportion of Cutibacterium acnes and Lactobacillus , most strikingly, Lactobacillus crispatus . The functional analysis using GO terms revealed that the young group has a higher significant expression of genes involved in biological and metabolic processes and in innate skin microbiome protection. The better comprehension of age-related impacts observed will later support the investigation of skin microbiome implications in antiaging protection.

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