Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Role of Probiotics in Gut Microbiome and Metabolome in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Mouse Model: A Comparative Study.

Microorganisms 2024 May 18
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent chronic liver condition worldwide. Numerous studies conducted recently have demonstrated a connection between the dysbiosis of the development of NAFLD and gut microbiota. Rebuilding a healthy gut ecology has been proposed as a strategy involving the use of probiotics. The purpose of this work is to investigate and compare the function of probiotics Akkermansia muciniphila ( A. muciniphila ) and VSL#3 in NAFLD mice. Rodent NAFLD was modeled using a methionine choline-deficient diet (MCD) with/without oral probiotic delivery. Subsequently, qPCR, histological staining, and liver function tests were conducted. Mass spectrometry-based analysis and 16S rDNA gene sequencing were used to investigate the liver metabolome and gut microbiota. We found that while both A. muciniphila and VSL#3 reduced hepatic fat content, A. muciniphila outperformed VSL#3. Furthermore, probiotic treatment restored the β diversity of the gut flora and A. muciniphila decreased the abundance of pathogenic bacteria such as Ileibacterium valens . These probiotics altered the metabolism in MCD mice, especially the glycerophospholipid metabolism. In conclusion, our findings distinguished the role of A. muciniphila and VSL#3 in NAFLD and indicated that oral-gavage probiotics remodel gut microbiota and improve metabolism, raising the possibility of using probiotics in the cure of NAFLD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app