Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Ocular injuries among patients with major trauma in England and Wales from 2004 to 2021.

Eye 2024 May 25
BACKGROUND: Ocular trauma is a significant cause of blindness and is often missed in polytrauma. No contemporary studies report eye injuries in the setting of severe trauma in the UK. We investigated ocular injury epidemiology and trends among patients suffering major trauma in England and Wales from 2004 to 2021.

METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study utilising the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) registry. Major trauma cases with concomitant eye injuries were included. Major trauma was defined as Injury Severity Score >15. Ocular injuries included globe, cranial nerve II, III, IV, and VI, and tear duct injuries. Orbital fractures and adnexal and lid injuries were not included. Demographics, injury profiles, and outcomes were extracted. We report descriptive statistics and 3-yearly trends.

RESULTS: Of 287 267 major trauma cases, 2368 (0.82%) had ocular injuries: prevalence decreased from 1.87% to 0.66% over the 2004-2021 period (P < 0.0001). Males comprised 72.2% of ocular injury cases, median age was 34.5 years. The proportion of ocular injuries from road traffic collisions fell from 43.1% to 25.3% while fall-related injuries increased and predominated (37.6% in 2019/21). Concomitant head injury occurred in 86.6%. The most common site of ocular injury was the conjunctiva (29.3%). Compared to previous TARN data (1989-2004), retinal injuries were threefold more prevalent (5.9% vs 18.5%), while corneal injuries were less (31.0% vs 6.6%).

CONCLUSIONS: Whilst identifying eye injuries in major trauma is challenging, it appears ocular injury epidemiology in this setting has shifted, though overall prevalence is low. These findings may inform prevention strategies, guideline development and resource allocation.

Full text links

We have located open access text paper links.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app