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Dizziness-related disability in persons with post-COVID condition: A cross sectional study.

BACKGROUND: Dizziness is a common symptom in post-COVID condition (PCC) which may have a large impact on several life domains. However, knowledge on dizziness-severity and disability in PCC is sparse.

OBJECTIVE: The aim was to describe the severity of dizziness-related disability in individuals with PCC, and how it is manifested in daily life.

METHODS: A questionnaire regarding symptoms of PCC, health, and dizziness-related handicap was administered online, and 524 persons with PCC and dizziness were included.

RESULTS: Mean score of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory was 35.2 (24.0) and 51.8%, were classified as having moderate/severe dizziness-related disability. The percentage of maximum value for the subscales were: Physical manifestation, 48%, Emotional Impact, 36% and Catastrophic Impact, 17%. The greatest influence on physical movements was when bending forward, head shaking or doing strenuous physical activities or household chores.

CONCLUSIONS: Half had moderate or severe dizziness-related disability and the physical manifestations occurred mostly during specific or strenuous body movements. This indicate a vestibular impairment that may be effectively managed with vestibular rehabilitation. Assessment and treatment of dizziness might be an essential part in PCC rehabilitation and future research should continue to explore the potential causal pathways of dizziness in PCC.

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