Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effectiveness of Several GRAS Salts against Fungal Rot of Fruit after Harvest and Assessment of the Phytotoxicity of Sodium Metabisufite in Treated Fruit.

This study evaluates the efficacy of the salts sodium metabisulfite (SMB), ammonium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate, and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate first in vitro against the main postharvest fruit rot fungi, Alternaria alternata , Botrytis cinerea , Penicillium italicum , and Penicillium digitatum . Results showed that 0.2% SMB completely inhibited the mycelium growth of the fungal species. Ammonium bicarbonate and sodium bicarbonate were less effective at 0.2% in inhibiting mycelial growth, ranging from 57.6% to 77.6%. The least effective was potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate. Experiments were also performed in vivo on wounded apples inoculated with the most pathogenic fungus, B. cinerea , and treated with SMB at concentrations of 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3%, both preventively and curatively. Results based on the decay size showed that SMB, when used as a preventive treatment, had a reduced efficacy, even with the highest concentration. However, this salt proved to be very effective at 0.5% in curative treatment since the decay was completely blocked. Our results suggest that the appropriate concentration of SMB for post-harvest treatment is 0.5% as a curative treatment. On the other hand, the 1% dose induced the onset of phytotoxicity around the wound. To assess the extent of the phytotoxicity reaction, higher concentrations of 1-4% SMB were applied to wounded fruit. Apples and oranges were inoculated or not with B. cinerea and P. digitatum , respectively. Doses of 1-4% induced phytotoxicity in the form of a discolored ring surrounding the wound on the epidermis of the fruit; this phytotoxicity enlarged as the concentration of SMB increased. The phytotoxic features were similar on apples and oranges. The methodological procedure made it possible to carry out a quantitative assessment of SMB phytotoxicity. This method is proposed as an easy-to-use technique for quantitatively estimating the phytotoxicity of antifungal compounds on post-harvest fruit.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app