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Inconsistency in the Reporting Terminology of Adverse Events and Complications in Hallux Valgus Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

Surgical complications are inevitable in any surgical subspecialty. Throughout the years, many classification systems have been developed to better understand and report such complications. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the variability and frequency of reporting terms used to describe adverse events and complications in hallux valgus reconstruction. We hypothesized that the terms used would be highly inconsistent, which further promotes a need for a standardized terminology reporting system. Studies related to hallux valgus reconstruction outcomes that met our predetermined inclusion criteria were investigated to identify and report the related adverse terms and complications. Adverse terms and complications were grouped into 9 categories. Of the 142 studies included, 376 distinct terms that described adverse events or complications related to hallux valgus reconstruction were identified. Of these, 73.4% (276/376) were mentioned only once in their respective studies. Five of 376 terms were mentioned in at least 25% of the papers, and only 2 of 376 were mentioned in at least 50%. The most frequently reported adverse events were "Recurrence," mentioned in 77 of 142 studies (54%), followed by "Nonunion," mentioned in 76 of 142 studies (53%). The most reported category was "Bone/Joint" with 135 related terms, mentioned in 135 of 376 of the papers (95.1%). The terminology used in reporting adverse events and complications in surgical hallux valgus correction was highly inconsistent and variable. This represents yet another barrier in accurate reporting of these terms, and subsequently a difficult analysis of the outcomes related to hallux valgus reconstruction. To overcome these challenges, we suggest developing a standardized terminology reporting system. Levels of Evidence: Level III; systematic review of Level III studies and above .

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