Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Safety and efficacy evaluation of halicin as an effective drug for inhibiting intestinal infections.

Halicin, the first antibacterial agent discovered by artificial intelligence, exerts broad-spectrum antibacterial effects and has a unique structure. Our study found that halicin had a good inhibitory effect on clinical isolates of drug-resistant strains and Clostridium perfringens ( C. perfringens ). The safety of halicin was evaluated by acute oral toxicity, genotoxicity and subchronic toxicity studies. The results of acute toxicity test indicated that halicin, as a low-toxicity compound, had an LD50 of 2018.3 mg/kg. The results of sperm malformation, bone marrow chromosome aberration and cell micronucleus tests showed that halicin had no obvious genotoxicity. However, the results of the 90-day subchronic toxicity test indicated that the test rats exhibited weight loss and slight renal inflammation at a high dose of 201.8 mg/kg. Teratogenicity of zebrafish embryos showed that halicin had no significant teratogenicity. Analysis of intestinal microbiota showed that halicin had a significant effect on the intestinal microbial composition, but caused a faster recovery. Furthermore, drug metabolism experiments showed that halicin was poorly absorbed and quickly eliminated in vivo . Our study found that halicin had a good therapeutic effect on intestinal infection model of C . perfringens . These results show the feasibility of developing oral halicin as a clinical candidate drug for treating intestinal infections.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app