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Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Adalimumab Versus Cyclosporine for Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease: A Randomized Controlled Study.

PURPOSE: To compare the 26-week cost-effectiveness of adalimumab-corticosteroids (ADA-CS) and cyclosporine-corticosteroids (CSA-CS) for Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH).

METHODS: A preplanned cost-effectiveness analysis based on the per-protocol population of a randomized-controlled trial. VKH subjects were randomized to receive either cyclosporine (100-200 mg daily) combined with corticosteroids or adalimumab (40 mg twice monthly) combined with corticosteroids. The primary outcome of this cost-effectiveness study was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) data were calculated by the medical records and health utility, respectively. Subgroup (early and late-phase VKH) analysis and sensitivity analyses were performed.

RESULTS: The ICER at 26 weeks was $62,425/QALY for the total participants. Compared to the CSA-CS group, costs in the ADA-CS group were more expensive (mean difference [ΔA-C]: $2,497) with more gains in QALYs (mean difference [ΔA-C]: 0.04). The probability of ADA-CS being cost-effective was 0.17 and 0.41 at willingness to pay (WTP) thresholds of $12,000/QALY and $36,000/QALY, respectively. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analyses showed consistent findings with the primary analysis.

CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of early or late-phase VKH, the CSA-CS strategy may be recommended as the preferred initial choice for the majority of VKH.

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