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Adherence with statins and all-cause mortality in days with high temperature.

PURPOSE: It has been suggested that statins may exert thermo-protective effects that can reduce mortality on hot days. We aimed to examine the relationship between statin adherence and mortality in days with high temperature.

METHODS: Utilizing data from a prior historical new-user cohort study, we analyzed a cohort of 229 918 individuals within a state-mandated health provider in Israel who initiated statin therapy between 1998 and 2006. Adherence to statins was assessed through the mean proportion of days covered (PDC) with statins during the follow-up period. The study's primary outcome was all-cause mortality during hot days.

RESULTS: During the study follow-up period, a total of 13 165 individuals (5.7%) died. In a multivariable model, a 10% increase in PDC with statins was associated with an HR of (0.85; 95% CI: 0.72-1.00) for deaths (n = 16) in extremely hot days (≥39°C). This association was numerically stronger compared to HR = 0.94 (0.93-0.94) in cooler days and displayed a significant difference between sexes. In males, the fully-adjusted HR for a 10% increase in PDC with statins was 0.66 (0.45-0.95), while in women, it was 0.98 (0.78-1.23). In contrast, no such effect modification was observed for death in cooler days.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings align with earlier research, supporting the notion that adherence with statin treatment may be associated with a reduced risk of death during extremely hot days, particularly among men.

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