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Rapid response system for critically ill patients with haematological malignancies: A pre- and post-intervention study.

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine whether implementing a rapid response system (RRS) is associated with improved short-term outcomes in critically ill patients with haematological malignancies.

METHODS: Our monocentric pre- versus post-intervention study was conducted between January 2012 and April 2020. RRS was activated at early signs of haemodynamic or respiratory failure. The primary outcome was the reduction in Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score on Day 3 after intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Secondary outcomes included time to ICU admission and mortality.

RESULTS: A total of 209 patients with a median age of 59 years were enrolled (108 in the pre-intervention period and 101 in the post-intervention period). 22% of them had received an allogeneic transplant. The post-intervention period was associated with a shorter time to ICU admission (195 vs. 390 min, p < .001), a more frequent favourable trend in SOFA score (57% vs. 42%, adjusted odds ratio, 2.02, 95% confidence interval, 1.09 to 3.76), no significant changes in ICU (22% vs. 26%, p = .48) and 1-year (62% vs. 58%, p = .62) mortality rates.

CONCLUSION: Detection of early organ failure and activation of an RRS was associated with faster ICU admission and lower SOFA scores on Day 3 of admission in critically ill patients with haematological malignancies.

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