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Benign hepatic schwannoma in a patient with chronic hepatitis B infection: A case report.

A primary benign hepatic schwannoma is an extremely rare disease with a good prognosis. A 55-year-old man with chronic hepatitis B was referred to our hospital because of jaundice, weight loss, and a hepatic lesion found during an ultrasound examination. Magnetic resonance image revealed a 55 × 120 mm solid mass lesion in the segment V and VIII of the liver. The mass extended directly to the segmental biliary ducts and common hepatic duct, causing obstruction of the biliary duct and upstream dilatation, particularly in the left liver lobe. Following the insertion of a percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, a biopsy was performed under ultrasound guidance. Histological examination confirmed a benign schwannoma, identified by characteristic pathological findings and positive immunoreactions with S-100 protein, but negative for c-kit, CD117, or CD34. The patient's tumor was removed and upon examination, it was discovered to be a mass filled with pinkish-yellow fluid, measuring 12 × 5 × 5 cm. This is the first known case of a benign schwannoma in the liver parenchyma of a patient with chronic hepatitis B. Furthermore, most previous cases of benign liver schwannomas have reported a smaller size than this case, which is slightly larger.

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