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Prevalence and risk factors for falls among older Chinese adults in the community: findings from the CLHLS study.

Older adults have a high prevalence of falls due to a decline in physiological functions and various chronic diseases. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for falls among older individuals in the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS). We collected information from 9737 older individuals (average age=84.26 years) from the CLHLS and used binary logistic regression analysis to explore the independent risk factors and protective factors for falls. The logistic regression analysis results are reported as adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs). The prevalence of falls among older adults in China was 21.6%, with women (24.6%) having a higher prevalence than men (18.1%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that never (or rarely) eating fresh fruit, difficulty with hearing, cataracts, and arthritis were the common independent risk factors for falls in older Chinese men and women. Among men, age ≥80 years (aOR=1.86), never doing housework (aOR=1.36), and dyslipidemia (aOR=1.47) were risk factors, while eating milk products once a week was a protective factor. Alcohol consumption (aOR=1.40), physical labor (aOR=1.28), and heart disease (aOR=1.21) were risk factors for falls in women, while a daily sleep duration of 6-12 h and garlic consumption once a week were protective factors. The prevalence of falls among older adults in China is 21.6% and is greater in women than in men. These risk and protective factors can be used to formulate reasonable recommendations for living habits, diet, and chronic disease control strategies.

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