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FRZB: a potential prognostic marker for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, with approximately 600,000 new cases each year. A small number of HNSCCs are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Frizzled related protein (FRZB) has been reported in many inflammatory diseases and cancers, but it is yet unclear how FRZB affects HNSCC, as well as its role and underlying mechanism. TIMER2 database was utilized to evaluate FRZB expression in cancer tissues, and FRZB expression in HNSCC tissues was confirmed by samples obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. To identify whether FRZB could be used as a prognostic predictor, we performed univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. FRZB co-expression profile was explored using the LinkedOmics database, then Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Gene Ontology enrichment analyses were performed for these FRZB-related genes in HNSCC samples. Lasso regression analysis was subsequently used to screen for prognostic variables, and we determined the infiltration of immune cells in HNSCC patients to clarify the influence of FRZB on tumor immune microenvironment. At last, we assessed the association between FRZB expression and immune checkpoint gene, and compared the sensitivity of common chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we found that FRZB was dysregulated in HNSCC tumor tissues and had a relationship with clinical parameters. The reliability and independence of FRZB as a factor in determining a patient's prognosis for HNSCC was also established. Additional investigation revealed that FRZB was linked to common immune checkpoint genes and may be implicated in immune infiltration.

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