Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A role of rectangularity in perceiving a 3D shape of an object.

Vision Research 2024 May 21
Rectangularity and perpendicularity of contours are important properties of 3D shape for the visual system and the visual system can use them asa prioriconstraints for perceivingshape veridically. The presentarticle provides a comprehensive review ofpriorstudiesofthe perception of rectangularity and perpendicularity anditdiscussestheir effects on3D shape perception from both theoretical and empiricalapproaches. It has been shown that the visual system is biased to perceive a rectangular 3D shape from a 2D image. We thought that this bias might be attributable to the likelihood of a rectangular interpretation but this hypothesis is not supported by the results of our psychophysical experiment. Note that the perception ofa rectangular shape cannot be explained solely on the basis of geometry. A rectangular shape is perceived from an image that is inconsistent with a rectangular interpretation. To address thisissue, we developed a computational model that can recover a rectangular shape from an image of a parallelopiped. The model allows the recovered shape to be slightly inconsistent so that the recovered shape satisfies the a priori constraints of maximum compactness and minimal surface area. This model captures someof thephenomenaassociated withthe perception of the rectangular shape that were reported inpriorstudies. This finding suggests that rectangularity works for shape perception by incorporatingitwith someadditionalconstraints.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app