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Factors Associated with Breastfeeding Initiation and Continuation at Two Months Postpartum in American Indian Women: An Exploratory Analysis.

This study aimed to determine the prevalence of breastfeeding initiation and continuation at two months postpartum in American Indian (AI) mothers in South Dakota and to identify factors associated with breastfeeding. Using logistic regression, data from the South Dakota Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System were used to investigate the relationship between binary breastfeeding initiation and continuation outcomes and maternal behaviors and experiences including access to health care, safe sleep practices, ability to handle life events, depression, and sources of breastfeeding information. Higher odds of initiation were seen for factors including access to health care services, ability to handle life events, and sources of breastfeeding information, while lower odds were seen for factors including safe sleep. Higher odds of continuation were seen among mothers who reported not taking long to get over setbacks and among mothers who reported no postpartum depression, while lower odds of continuation were seen among mothers practicing safe sleep. Several modifiable factors were identified as reasons for stopping breastfeeding. This information about factors associated with higher odds of breastfeeding initiation and continuation at two months postpartum can be used to inform interventions, programs, and policies designed to support breastfeeding among AI women and to guide future research in this area.

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