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Analysis of the incidence and mortality trends of esophageal cancer in cancer registry areas of China and Japan.

This study aims to analyze the prevalence trend of esophageal cancer in Japan and China to provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of esophageal cancer. The results showed that the incidence rate for the years 2010-2018 significantly decreased with an APC of 5.66%, and the mortality rate from 2010 to 2015 had an APC of -5.87% in China. However, the incidence rate of Japanese women showed an upward trend, with an APC of 4.09% from 2010 to 2019. The mortality rate of esophageal cancer in Japan showed a downward trend, with an APC of -2.96% from 2010 to 2021. From 2010 to 2018, Chinese esophageal squamous cell carcinoma accounted for the highest proportion, accounting for 85.96%, with the largest distribution in the middle, accounting for 47.25%. Patients are mostly diagnosed at stage III, and the relative survival rate from 2012 to 2015 was 30.3%. Japan also has the highest proportion of squamous cell carcinoma, and the lesions are also mostly located in the middle segment. While Japanese esophageal cancer patients are mostly diagnosed at stage I, and the relative survival rate was 41.5% in Japan from 2009 to 2011. The results of this article indicate that the current prevalence of esophageal cancer in China and Japan is generally declining, and the quality of life of patients is gradually improving, but effective screening and prevention strategies are still needed to reduce the burden of this disease.

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