Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Effects of intravenous single-bolus lidocaine infusion versus intravenous single-bolus magnesium sulfate infusion on postoperative pain, emotional status, and quality of life in patients undergoing spine fusion surgery: a randomized study.

BACKGROUND: We assessed the efficiency of intravenous adjuvants in decreasing opioid intake and pain scores after spine fusion surgery.

METHODS: This study included 120 patients aged 18-60 listed for spine fusion surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups: Group (Lidocaine): received IV lidocaine 4 mg/kg in 50 mL volume over 30 min. Group (Magnesium): received IV magnesium sulfate 30mg/kg in 50 mL volume over 30 min. Group (combined Lidocaine and Magnesium): received IV lidocaine 4 mg/kg in 50 mL volume over 30 min.+IV magnesium sulfate 30mg/kg in 50 mL volume over 30 min. Group (Control): received IV saline 50 mL. The time to the first request analgesia, the postoperative pain score, total analgesic use, patient satisfaction, anxiety, depression, mental state, quality of life, and side effects were measured.

RESULTS: The combined group had more extended time for the first analgesic request and fewer rescue analgesia doses than the other groups. NRS scores at rest or movement were statistically significantly lower in the lidocaine group and the combined group compared to the control group (P1, P3<0.05) at almost all times. This combination reduces anxiety and depression and improves overall health up to three months after a single infusion. The combined group had higher patient satisfaction.

CONCLUSIONS: A synergistic effect of a combination of lidocaine and magnesium sulfate on perioperative pain was found. It reduces analgesic consumption, depression, and anxiety and improves overall health up to three months after a single infusion dose.

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