Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Oxidative potential of particulate matter and its association to respiratory health endpoints in high-altitude cities in Bolivia.

Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution is a significant health risk, driving the search for innovative metrics that more accurately reflect the potential harm to human health. Among these, oxidative potential (OP) has emerged as a promising health-based metric, yet its application and relevance across different environments remain to be further explored. This study, set in two high-altitude Bolivian cities, aims to identify the most significant sources of PM-induced oxidation in the lungs and assess the utility of OP in assessing PM health impacts. Utilizing two distinct assays, OPDTT and OPDCFH , we measured the OP of PM samples, while also examining the associations between PM mass, OP, and black carbon (BC) concentrations with hospital visits for acute respiratory infections (ARI) and pneumonia over a range of exposure lags (0-2 weeks) using a Poisson regression model adjusted for meteorological conditions. The analysis also leveraged Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to link these health outcomes to specific PM sources, building on a prior source apportionment study utilizing the same dataset. Our findings highlight anthropogenic combustion, particularly from traffic and biomass burning, as the primary contributors to OP in these urban sites. Significant correlations were observed between both OPDTT and PM2.5 concentration exposure and ARI hospital visits, alongside a notable association with pneumonia cases and OPDTT levels. Furthermore, PMF analysis demonstrated a clear link between traffic-related pollution and increased hospital admissions for respiratory issues, affirming the health impact of these sources. These results underscore the potential of OPDTT as a valuable metric for assessing the health risks associated with acute PM exposure, showcasing its broader application in environmental health studies.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app