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The Use of Biologic Agents for the Treatment of Cutaneous Immune-Related Adverse Events from Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: A Review of Reported Cases.

Cutaneous immune-related adverse events encompass a spectrum of dermatological manifestations, including lichenoid reactions, psoriasiform eruptions, eczematous dermatitis, immunobullous disorders, granulomatous reactions, pruritus, vitiligo, and severe cutaneous adverse reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The conventional approach to treating high-grade or refractory cutaneous immune-related adverse events has involved high-dose systemic corticosteroids. However, their use is limited owing to the potential disruption of antitumor responses and associated complications. To address this, corticosteroid-sparing targeted immunomodulators have been explored as therapeutic alternatives. Biologic agents, commonly employed for non-cutaneous immune-related adverse events such as colitis, are increasingly recognized for their efficacy in treating various patterns of cutaneous immune-related adverse events, including psoriasiform, immunobullous, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome-like reactions. This review consolidates findings from the English-language literature, highlighting the use of biologic agents in managing diverse cutaneous immune-related adverse event patterns, also encompassing maculopapular, eczematous, and lichenoid eruptions, pruritus, and transient acantholytic dermatosis (Grover disease). Despite the established efficacy of these agents, further research is necessary to explore their long-term effects on antitumor responses.

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