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Effectiveness and safety of GLP-1 agonist in obese patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

BACKGROUND: Obesity affects many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 agonists are a promising therapy for obese patients. However, there is a lack of evidence of the use of these drugs in IBD populations. We investigated the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 agonists in a cohort of obese patients with IBD.

METHODS: We analyzed a cohort of consecutive IBD patients who received GLP-1 agonists indicated for treating obesity between 2019 and 2021. The GLP-1 agonists included were semaglutide 1.0 mg or liraglutide 3.0 mg. The coprimary endpoints were the percentage of change in body weight from baseline to 6 months and a weight reduction of 5% or more at 6 months. In addition, we reviewed the safety profile of GLP-1 agonist therapy and its impact on the IBD course.

RESULTS: We included 16 obese patients with IBD (9 CD and 7 UC). The median body mass index at baseline was 35 (32-37). The percentage of change in body weight was -6.2% (-3.4-(-8.5)) at 6 months, and a 5% or more weight reduction was achieved in 58.3% (7/12) of patients at 6 months. The most common side effect was nausea (13.3%), and one patient withdrew for diarrhea. IBD activity score did not change significantly during follow-up.

CONCLUSION: Our results showed that GLP-1 agonists were effective and had a good safety profile in IBD patients. Most adverse effects were mild, and the IBD activity had no significant changes.

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