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Trimatch comparison of the prognosis of hypochloremia, normolchloremia and hyperchloremia in patients with septic shock.

BACKGROUND: Septic shock is a lethal disease, and identifying high-risk patients through noninvasive and widely available biomarkers can help improve global outcomes. While the clinical impact of chloride levels on critically ill patients remains unclear, this study aims to investigate the association between hypochloremia and mortality following ICU admission among septic shock patients.

METHODS: This is an analysis of data stored in the databases of Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care IV (MIMIC-IV). The initial chloride levels were classified ashypochloremia, normal chloraemia, and hyperchloraemia. A multivariate logistic regression model was applied, adjusting for age, lactate, pH, PO2, urine volume, RDW, creatinine, and liver disease, to assess the association between the three categories of chloride levels and mortality.

RESULTS: Of 3726 patients included in the study, 470 patients (12.6%) had hypochloremia on ICU admission. During the follow-up period, 1120 (33.5%) patients died. Hypochloremia was significantly associated with increased mortality and the incidence of AKI after adjusting for several variables.

CONCLUSIONS: Hypochloremia is independently associated with higher hospital mortality, AKI incidence among septic shock patients. However, further high-quality research is necessary to establish the precise relationship between hypochloremia and septic shock prognosis.

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