Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Role of the BCL11A/B homologue Chronophage (Cph) in locomotor behaviour of Drosophila melanogaster.

Neuroscience 2024 May 18
Functioning of the nervous system requires proper formation and specification of neurons as well as accurate connectivity and signalling between them. Locomotor behaviour depends upon these events that occur during neural development, and any aberration in them could result in motor disorders. Transcription factors are believed to be master regulators that control these processes, but very few linked to behaviour have been identified so far. The Drosophila homologue of BCL11A (CTIP1) and BCL11B (CTIP2), Chronophage (Cph), was recently shown to be involved in temporal patterning of neural stem cells but its role in post-mitotic neurons is not known. We show that knockdown of Cph in neurons during development results in animals with locomotor defects at both larval and adult stages. The defects are more severe in adults, with inability to stand, uncoordinated behaviour and complete loss of ability to walk, climb, or fly. These defects are similar to the motor difficulties observed in some patients with mutations in BCL11A and BCL11B. Electrophysiological recordings showed reduced evoked activity and irregular neuronal firing. All Cph-expressing neurons in the ventral nerve cord are glutamatergic. Our results imply that Cph modulates primary locomotor activity through configuration of glutamatergic neurons. Thus, this study ascribes a hitherto unknown role to Cph in locomotor behaviour of Drosophila melanogaster.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app