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Effects of clamshell exercises in terminal extension lag after ACL reconstruction.

Knee 2024 May 19
BACKGROUND: Terminal extension lag (TEL) is common following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Clamshell exercises have been suggested as a potential intervention to address TEL, but limited research has been conducted in this area.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the effects of Clamshell exercises in terminal extension lag after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

METHODS: This randomized controlled trial included 40 participants with a history of ACLR between 1 and 3 years prior. Participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (Group A) or the control group (Group B). Group A received conventional exercises along with isolated hip strengthening rehabilitation, while Group B received conventional exercises without specific hip strengthening. The primary outcomes were pain levels (Numeric Pain Rating Scale), knee function (International Knee Documentation Committee scores, (IKDC)), range of motions (goniometer) and strength (sphygmomanometer).

RESULTS: In between the group comparison shows that all outcome measures (NPRS, IKDC, Goniometer, Sphygmomanometer) show significant results (p < 0.05). Within-group comparisons (paired sample t-test) show that there was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in all outcome measures of both groups.

CONCLUSION: The addition of Clamshell exercises to the rehabilitation program resulted in a significantly greater reduction in TEL compared to the control group. These findings suggest that Clamshell exercises were found to be an effective intervention for addressing TEL after ACLR.

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