Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Metabolically healthy obesity and risks of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, a matched cohort study: the Shizuoka study.

BACKGROUND: Metabolically healthy obesity is not always a benign condition. It is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. We investigated the prognostic significance of metabolically healthy obesity by comparing clinical profile-matched metabolically healthy obesity and non-obesity groups.

METHODS: We analyzed a health insurance dataset with annual health checkup data from Japan. The analyzed data included 168,699 individuals aged <65 years. Obesity was defined as ≥25 kg/m2 body mass index. Metabolically healthy was defined as ≤1 metabolic risk factor (high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or high hemoglobin A1c). Incidence rates of stroke, myocardial infarction, and all-cause mortality identified from the insurance data were compared between metabolically healthy obesity and non-obesity groups (n = 8644 each) using a log-rank test.

RESULTS: The stroke (obesity: 9.2 per 10,000 person-years; non-obesity: 10.5; log-rank test p = 0.595), myocardial infarction (obesity: 3.7; non-obesity: 3.1; p = 0.613), and all-cause mortality (obesity: 26.6; non-obesity: 23.2; p = 0.304) incidence rates did not differ significantly between the metabolically healthy obesity and non-obesity groups, even when the abdominal obesity was considered in the analysis. The lack of association was also observed in the comparison between the metabolically unhealthy obesity and non-obesity groups (n = 10,965 each). The population with metabolically healthy obesity reported negligibly worse metabolic profiles than the population with non-obesity at the 5.6-year follow-up.

CONCLUSION: Obesity, when accompanied by a healthy metabolic profile, did not increase the risk of cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app