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Ophthalmic Drug Effects on the Amyloidogenesis of a Transforming Growth Factor β-induced Protein (TGFBIp) Peptide Fragment.

Drugs that can treat one disease may either be detrimental or beneficial toward another due to possible cross-interactions. Therefore, care in choosing a suitable drug for patients with multiple diseases is crucial in successful patient management. This study explores several currently available ophthalmic drugs used to treat common ocular diseases to understand how they can affect the amyloidogenesis of a transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) peptide fragment found in abundance in the corneal protein aggregation deposits of lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) patients. Results from this study provided supporting evidence that some drugs intended to treat other diseases can enhance or inhibit fibrillar aggregation of TGFBIp peptide, which may have potential implication of affecting the disease progression of LCD by either worsening or ameliorating it. Comparisons of the different properties of ophthalmic compounds explored in this study may also provide some guidance for future design of drugs geared toward the treatment of LCD.

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