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MRI radiomics nomogram integrating postoperative adjuvant treatments in recurrence risk prediction for patients with early-stage cervical cancer.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant treatments are valuable to decrease the recurrence rate and improve survival for early-stage cervical cancer patients (ESCC), Therefore, recurrence risk evaluation is critical for the choice of postoperative treatment. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based radiomics nomogram integrating postoperative adjuvant treatments was constructed and validated externally to improve the recurrence risk prediction for ESCC.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: 212 ESCC patients underwent surgery and adjuvant treatments from three centers were enrolled and divided into the training, internal validation, and external validation cohorts. Their clinical data, pretreatment T2-weighted images (T2WI) were retrieved and analyzed. Radiomics models were constructed using machine learning methods with features extracted and screen from sagittal and axial T2WI. A nomogram for recurrence prediction was build and evaluated using multivariable logistic regression analysis integrating radiomic signature and adjuvant treatments.

RESULTS: A total of 8 radiomic features were screened out of 1020 extracted features. The extreme gradient boosting (XGboost) model based on MRI radiomic features performed best in recurrence prediction with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.833, 0.822 in the internal and external validation cohorts, respectively. The nomogram integrating radiomic signature and clinical factors achieved an AUC of 0.806, 0.718 in the internal and external validation cohorts, respectively, for recurrence risk prediction for ESCC.

CONCLUSION: In this study, the nomogram integrating T2WI radiomic signature and clinical factors is valuable to predict the recurrence risk, thereby allowing timely planning for effective treatments for ESCC with high risk of recurrence.

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