Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Associations between OGTT results during pregnancy and offspring TSH levels: a birth cohort study.

BACKGROUND: Limited evidence exists regarding the association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and elevated levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in newborns. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the potential risk of elevated TSH levels in infants exposed to maternal GDM, considering the type and number of abnormal values obtained from the 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT).

METHODS: A population-based, prospective birth cohort study was conducted in Wuhan, China. The study included women who underwent GDM screening using a 75-g OGTT. Neonatal TSH levels were measured via a time-resolved immunofluorescence assay. We estimated and stratified the overall risk (adjusted Risk Ratio [RR]) of elevated TSH levels (defined as TSH > 10 mIU/L or > 20 mIU/L) in offspring based on the type and number of abnormal OGTT values.

RESULTS: Out of 15,236 eligible mother-offspring pairs, 11.5% (1,753) of mothers were diagnosed with GDM. Offspring born to women diagnosed with GDM demonstrated a statistically significant elevation in TSH levels when compared to offspring of non-GDM mothers, with a mean difference of 0.20 [95% CI: 0.04-0.36]. The incidence of elevated TSH levels (TSH > 10 mIU/L) in offspring of non-GDM women was 6.3 per 1,000 live births. Newborns exposed to mothers with three abnormal OGTT values displayed an almost five-fold increased risk of elevated TSH levels (adjusted RR 4.77 [95% CI 1.64-13.96]). Maternal fasting blood glucose was independently and positively correlated with neonatal TSH levels and elevated TSH status (TSH > 20 mIU/L).

CONCLUSIONS: For newborns of women with GDM, personalized risk assessment for elevated TSH levels can be predicated on the type and number of abnormal OGTT values. Furthermore, fasting blood glucose emerges as a critical predictive marker for elevated neonatal TSH status.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app