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Dual-energy lattice-tip ablation system for persistent atrial fibrillation: a randomized trial.

Nature Medicine 2024 May 18
Clinical outcomes of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) are suboptimal due, in part, to challenges in achieving durable lesions. Although focal point-by-point ablation allows for the creation of any required lesion set, this strategy necessitates the generation of contiguous lesions without gaps. A large-tip catheter, capable of creating wide-footprint ablation lesions, may increase ablation effectiveness and efficiency. In a randomized, single-blind, non-inferiority trial, 420 patients with persistent AF underwent ablation using a large-tip catheter with dual pulsed field and radiofrequency energies versus ablation using a conventional radiofrequency ablation system. The primary composite effectiveness endpoint was evaluated through 1 year and included freedom from acute procedural failure and repeat ablation at any time, plus arrhythmia recurrence, drug initiation or escalation or cardioversion after a 3-month blanking period. The primary safety endpoint was freedom from a composite of serious procedure-related or device-related adverse events. The primary effectiveness endpoint was observed for 73.8% and 65.8% of patients in the investigational and control arms, respectively (P < 0.0001 for non-inferiority). Major procedural or device-related complications occurred in three patients in the investigational arm and in two patients in the control arm (P < 0.0001 for non-inferiority). In a secondary analysis, procedural times were shorter in the investigational arm as compared to the control arm (P < 0.0001). These results demonstrate non-inferior safety and effectiveness of the dual-energy catheter for the treatment of persistent AF. Future large-scale studies are needed to gather real-world evidence on the impact of the focal dual-energy lattice catheter on the broader population of patients with AF. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT05120193 .

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