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Antigout effects and mechanisms of total flavonoids from prunus tomentosa.

BACKGROUND: In recent years, hyperuricemia and acute gouty arthritis have become increasingly common, posing a serious threat to public health. Current treatments primarily involve Western medicines with associated toxic side effects.

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the therapeutic effects of total flavones from Prunus tomentosa (PTTF) on a rat model of gout and explore the mechanism of PTTF's anti-gout action through the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

METHODS: We measured serum uric acid (UA), creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Histopathological changes were observed using HE staining, and the expression levels of relevant proteins were detected through Western blotting.

RESULTS: After PTTF treatment, all indicators improved significantly. PTTF reduced blood levels of UA, Cr, BUN, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, and decreased ankle swelling.

CONCLUSIONS: PTTF may have a therapeutic effect on animal models of hyperuricemia and acute gouty arthritis by reducing serum UA levels, improving ankle swelling, and inhibiting inflammation. The primary mechanism involves the regulation of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway to alleviate inflammation. Further research is needed to explore deeper mechanisms.

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