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Relationship of intensive care scoring systems with neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, platelet/lymphocyte ratio, and mean platelet volume values.

OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the relationship between NLR, PLR, and MPV values and scoring systems frequently used in intensive care units in our study.

METHODS: In our retrospective study, patients aged 18 years and over who received treatment in the intensive care unit for at least 48 hours were included. Demographic data, such as age, gender, APACHE II, SOFA and GCS scores, expected mortality, and 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were recorded.

RESULTS: There was a significant positive correlation between MPV values and APACHE, SOFA, and expected mortality rates, and a significant negative correlation between GCS values. It was also found to be significant that as the P/L ratio increased, APACHE, SOFA scores, and expected mortality rates decreased and GCS increased. In 30-day and 1-year mortalities, MPV values and CRP/albumin ratios were higher, and calcium values were significantly lower. The N/L ratios were also significantly higher in 1-year mortality.

CONCLUSION: In our study, a significant correlation was found between APACHE, GCS, SOFA, expected death rates and MPV and P/L rates. In conclusion, we suggest that in addition to intensive care scoring systems, the N/L ratio, P/L ratio, MPV, and CRP/albumin ratios can be used in the prognosis of patients (Tab. 5, Fig. 2, Ref. 18).

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