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Mechanisms of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in ameliorating hyperuricemia: insights into gut microbiota and intestinal function in a mouse model.

Food & Function 2024 May 18
Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a prominent bioactive compound found in tea, offers numerous health benefits. Previous studies have highlighted its potential in mitigating hyperuricemia. In this study, hyperuricemic mice induced by potassium oxonate (PO) were treated with EGCG or the anti-hyperuricemia medication allopurinol (AP) to investigate the mechanisms underlying their anti-hyperuricemic effects. The results demonstrated that both EGCG and AP significantly reduced serum uric acid (UA) levels. Further analysis revealed that EGCG promoted the expression of UA secretion transporter genes ( Oat1 and Oct1 ) while inhibiting the expression of UA reabsorption transporter genes ( Urat1 and Glut9 ) in the kidney. By 16S rDNA sequencing, EGCG, but not AP, was found to alter the composition of the gut microbiota. Notably, EGCG induced significant changes in the relative abundance of specific bacteria such as Lactobacillus , Faecalibaculum , and Bifidobacterium , which displayed high correlations with serum UA levels and UA-related gene expression. Metabolomic analysis suggested that EGCG-induced modifications in bacterial metabolites might contribute to the alleviation of hyperuricemia. Transcriptomic analysis of the intestinal epithelium identifies 191 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in EGCG-treated mice, including 8 purine-related genes. This study elucidates the anti-hyperuricemic mechanisms of EGCG, particularly its influence on the gut microbiota and gene expression in the intestinal epithelium.

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