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Safety and Efficacy of Radiosynoviorthesis: A Prospective Canadian Multicenter Study.

Radiosynoviorthesis is approved in several European countries and the United States to treat refractory synovitis in many inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathies, and other arthritic joint diseases. No radiopharmaceuticals for radiosynoviorthesis are currently approved in Canada. The aim of this Health Canada-approved trial was to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of radiosynoviorthesis. Methods: Between July 2012 and November 2017, we conducted a multicenter, prospective, interventional Canadian trial. Patients ( n = 360) with synovitis refractory to standard treatments after failing 2 intraarticular glucocorticoid injections were included. They were followed up at 3, 6, and 12 mo. Outcome measures included adverse events (AEs) and clinical signs of synovitis (pain, swelling, and joint effusion) measured with the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, the Disease Activity Score, and the Visual Analog Scale. Results: In total, 392 joints were treated, including those reinjected after 6 mo ( n = 34). Of these, 83.4% (327/392) were injected with [90 Y]Y-citrate for the knees and 9.9% (39/392) with [186 Re]Re-sulfide for medium-sized joints. Of the joints treated, 82.7% (324/392) were knees. Fifty-five AEs, most of them of mild grade, occurred and resolved without sequelae and were not life-threatening. The incidence of radiosynoviorthesis-related AEs was 9.4% (34/360). The proportion of patients showing an improvement in synovitis symptoms after radiosynoviorthesis was significant at 3 mo and was maintained up to 12 mo ( P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study confirmed the safety of radiosynoviorthesis in the treatment of patients with synovitis refractory to standard treatments. There is evidence of sustained clinical efficacy at 12 mo, suggesting that radiosynoviorthesis is an effective treatment for improving synovitis symptoms.

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