Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The inferocentral whorl region and its directional patterns in the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus: A review.

There has been a growing application of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) in the examination of corneal microstructure, including different corneal layers and corneal nerve fibers in health and in pathological conditions. Corneal nerves forming the sub-basal nerve plexus (SBNP) beneath the corneal basal epithelial cell layer in particular have been intensively researched in health and disease as a marker for corneal neurophysioanatomical and degenerative changes. One intriguing feature in the SBNP that is found inferior to the corneal apex, is a whorl-like pattern (or vortex) of nerves, which represents an anatomical landmark. Evidence has indicated that the architecture of this 'whorl region' is dynamic, changing with time in healthy individuals but also in disease conditions such as in diabetic neuropathy and keratoconus. This review summarizes the known information regarding the characteristics and significance of the whorl region of nerves in the corneal SBNP, as a potential area of high relevance for future disease monitoring and diagnostics.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app