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Current of injury amplitude during left bundle branch area pacing implantation: impact of filter settings, ventricular pacing and lead type.

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Monitoring current of injury (COI) during left bundle branch area pacing (LBBAP) implantation is useful to evaluate lead depth. Technical aspects for recording COI amplitude have not been well studied. Our aims were to evaluate the impact of high-pass filter settings on electrogram recordings during LBBAP implantation.

METHODS: Consecutive patients with successful LBBAP implantation had unipolar recordings of COI at final lead position at different high-pass filter settings (0.01Hz- 1Hz) from the tip electrode during sensing and pacing, and from the ring electrode during sensing. Duration of saturation-induced signal loss was also measured at each filter setting. COI amplitudes were compared between lumenless and stylet-driven leads.

RESULTS: A total of 156 patients (96 males, aged 81.4±9.6 years) were included. Higher filter settings led to significantly lower COI amplitudes. In 50 patients with COI amplitude <10 mV, the magnitude of the drop was on average 1-1.5mV (and up to 4mV) between 0.05 Hz and 0.5 Hz meaning that cutoffs may not be used interchangeably. Saturation-induced signal loss was on average 10 s at 0.05 Hz and only 2 s with 0.5 Hz. When pacing was interrupted, the sensed COI amplitude varied (either higher or lower) by up to 4 mV, implying that it is advisable to periodically interrupt pacing to evaluate the sensed COI when reaching levels of ∼ 10 mV. Lead type did not impact COI amplitude.

CONCLUSIONS: High-pass filters have a significant impact on electrogram characteristics at LBBAP implantation, with the 0.5 Hz settings having the most favourable profile.

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