Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Loss-of-function mutation in DDX53 associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia-like disorder.

DEAD-box helicase 53 (DDX53) is a member of the DEAD-box protein family of RNA helicases. Unlike other family members that are responsible for RNA metabolism, the biological function of DDX53 and its impact on the human condition are unclear. Herein, we found a full-length DDX53 deletion mutation in a hereditary spastic paraplegia-like (HSP-like) patient with lower extremity spasticity, walking disorder, visual impairment, and lateral ventricular white matter lesions. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that DDX53 was mainly expressed in the cerebellar cortex and may function as a tissue-specific RNA helicase. Transcriptome analysis showed that the expression of multiple brain-associated genes involved in synapse organization, neuron function, and neuromuscular junctions was affected by DDX53 depletion. Moreover, RNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (RIP-seq) analysis showed that DDX53 interacted with 176 genes, and 96 of these genes were associated with the execution of neurofunction, particularly in the regulation of cell projection organization and nervous system development. Collectively, although a more specified cell or animal model is required to fully understand the functional role of DDX53 in the human brain, we report for the first time that the patient with DDX53 defects exhibits HSP-like symptoms and that DDX53 is essential for maintaining neuronal function, with loss-of-function mutation in DDX53 potentially leading to HSP due to impaired RNA metabolism in the nervous system. KEY MESSAGES: DDX53 deficiency was first reported to be associated with HSP disorder. DDX53 exhibited minimal impact on mitochondrial function. DDX53 impaired RNA metabolism in the nervous system.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app